"Newly discovered" by trenton baylor

"Newly discovered" by trenton baylor

TRENTON BAYLOR

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Trenton Baylor received a Bachelor’s degree in Art and Certification to Teach Art (K-12) from the University of Wisconsin-Parkside ’96 and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison ’99. He is currently a tenured faculty member in the Art Department at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside where he teaches Sculpture and Woodworking and Furniture Design courses. He continues to exhibit his sculpture in local, regional, and national exhibitions and has several works in public and private collections. When he is away from the classroom and studio he enjoys spending time with his wife and children.

"My work is inspired by the young seedlings growing in the backyard and the machinery that hums, rumbles, shifts, and glides. I developed a love of nature as a young boy while helping my mother in the garden and I am certain that the many trips in the passenger seat of my father’s semi-truck account for my interest in machinery. It has been these experiences throughout the years that have become the theme and formal aesthetic of my art. As an aesthetic element, nature is alluded to in the surface coloration, form, organic transitions, and natural materials. In contrast, the use of cast and machined parts, polished surfaces, steel, aluminum, and hard edges connote the mechanical. In combination these two opposing forces fight and complement each other in a way that requires a delicate balance."

Materials: The base of the sculpture (stems) and petals will be constructed of welded plate steel and will be bolted together with grade 5 bolts. The flower tops and caps will be cast aluminum. The stems, all steel components and selected aluminum components will be painted with a durable enamel paint that will protect the materials from deterioration. Being that there are no moving parts, the sculpture will not be of danger to the viewer, nor will it require any additional maintenance.

Dimensions: approximately 11' tall x 8' wide x 8' deep.


MICHAEL KAUTZER

A graduate of the UW-Milwaukee School of Architecture, Michael Kautzer has spent the last eight years exploring the concept of "epitecture" or "architecture that relies upon": a concept that focuses on the positive aspects of adding architectural elements to natural and man-made environments. This exploration has produced such projects as FRAME gallery (a backpack-mounted gallery space), Epitectural Blockks (markers of underappreciated spaces), and Neu Museum of Contemporary Art (a museum celebrating the life and times of his grandparents), with each making use of a variety of media/art forms, including: sculpture, performance, and installation.

The hiking/biking trail that circumvents the Wilson Center is seen as a single artistic experience with two proposed sculptures being anchors on either end. Each one is based on the idea of a classroom with walls covered in chalkboards. These rooms are then unfolded to fit the location.

"the explorer" by michael kautzer

"the explorer" by michael kautzer

The Explorer, created for the Southeast Field sculpture location, provides an enclosed space to contrast with the openness of the field. It is comprised of panels 6' in height and 9' or 11' in length. The outside faces are painted light blue to reflect the field's open sky. The inside is covered in chalkboard paint that provides kids and adults the opportunity to leave their mark.

Materials (each panel): 2x4 stud frame sheathed in .5" plywood, trimmed in unfinished red cedar, connected with steel hinges, supported by 4x4 posts buried in the ground.

Dimensions (panel sizes): 6'H x 9'W (2.5' x 5' horizontal/vertical opening); 6'H x 11'W (3.5' x 1.75' vertical openings)

 
"the traveler" by michael kautzer

"the traveler" by michael kautzer

The Traveler, created with the Northwoods location in mind, provides a barrier that creates an outdoor space shielded from the road and focused towards the woods across the path. It is comprised of panels 6' in height and various lengths, the longest being 11'. The outside faces are painted rose, inspired by flowers surrounding the Wilson Center. The inside is covered in chalkboard paint that provides children and adults the opportunity to leave their mark.

Materials (each panel): 2x4 stud frame sheathed in .5" plywood, trimmed in unfinished red cedar, connected with steel hinges, supported by 4x4 posts buried in the ground.

Dimensions (panel sizes): 6'H x 9'W (2.5' x 5' horizontal/vertical opening); 6'H x 11'W (3.5' x 1.75' vertical openings)

 


GAIL SIMPSON & ARISTOTLE GEORGIADES

Gail Simpson and Aristotle Georgiades are sculptors and public artists who work individually and as part of Actual Size Artworks, a collaborative team. We are committed to the idea of artist as citizen and believe in the transformative potential of artwork in the community. Our work is characterized by a strong profile, a sense of humor, and excellent craftsmanship. Our public art projects can be seen in Oregon, Washington, Wisconsin, Nevada, Kansas, North Carolina, Minnesota, Illinois, and other locations nationally. We have also exhibited temporary projects around the United States and Europe. Simpson has an MFA in Sculpture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and is originally from Chicago. Her individual work expresses her interest in the intersection between the built and natural environment. Aris Georgiades is originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and has an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BFA from University of Michigan. His sculptures use salvaged building materials and objects, related to issues of adaptability and the changing nature of work, usefulness, and ambition. His work can be seen at Carl Hammer Gallery in Chicago. Both artists reside in Stoughton, Wisconsin, and teach at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

"host" by gail simpson & aristotle georgiades

"host" by gail simpson & aristotle georgiades

“Host” is based on the form of an acorn, interpreted as a schematic grid of compartments. Oak trees are an important part of the natural environment of Wisconsin as well as its history. At least seven kinds of oak trees are native to the area and several significant oaks are located on the grounds of Mitchell Park, some dating as far back as 1750. The acorn seems like an apt metaphor for the role of the Sharon Lynne Wilson Center in the community—helping residents and visitors grow into their potential as citizens and stewards of the culture and environment. The compartments in the sculpture will be built to contain plant material during the growing season, and bird seed during the winter. We have experience working with landscape material but would research the kind of plants that will work well in the structure—depending on sun and shade, drainage, and wind—to make sure the sculpture is sustainable. (We would work with the Center’s landscaping crew if possible on the plant selection.) During the winter bird seed can be placed in the compartments to create visual and educational interest during the colder months. We intend to use salvaged lumber for most of the sculpture as possible and we have an inventory of material that should make this possible. The sculpture is about 6’ in its longest dimension and has an inner aluminum framework to allow drainage, with salvaged wood inserts. The wood will be stained a palette of ochre and terra cotta-red, and will be built with full consideration of safety and durability concerns. 

Materials: Aluminum framework, salvaged lumber, paint, plant material

Dimensions: 6' h x 50" dia.